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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
built environment." one key issue: how to protect the new york subway system which experienced the worst damage in it's 108 year history. many stations remain submerged under several feet of water even as limited operations are expected to resume tomorrow. but infrastructure renovations are not always a clear fix. mayor michael bloomberg, who has taken a number of steps to make new york a greener city, has not yet proposed a major infrastructure change that might deal with rising water levels, for example. but he warned again today that citizens and policymakers need to take climate change predictions seriously. >> it's not the sort of thing that you can ever say for sure but the consequences of making a mistake in either direction are pretty severe and i think what we have to do is learn from this and protect our infrastructure to the extent possible. the bottom line is we've lost some people, we have to make sure we help their families and pray for them. we have to at the same time ensure that we go forward here and keep the city going. >> suarez: part of the growing problem: new york'
on energy and the environment at the american enterprise institute, a conservative think tank. gentlemen, we heard mayor bloomberg, governor cuomo sort of wrestling outloud with making these choices. knowing what e know does philadelphia, does boston, does new york have to use a changed municipal math to run its daily affairs because of threats of these kinds of things? joe kromm? >> well, i think as governor cuomo said, it'sro a new normal but we have old infrastructure. i think if f you listen to client scientists -- if we had listened to climate sientists who worned, no could flood like this, that storm surges were going to increase as the sea levels rose because of gobel warming and because of more intense storms we might have prevented it. now i think we need to listen to climate scientists who are warning that sea levels could rise, two feet-- as you heard-- by the middle of the century but three, four, five and six feet by the end of the century. so our choices are twofold. we should reduce greenhouse gas emissions so we're on the low end of future warming estimates and secondly we've
. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working t solve soci and environment problems at homand oundhe world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... friends of the newshour. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: hurricane sandy beg battering its way ashore today, threatening days of destruction. the huge system had 50 million people in its sights and was already being called a superstorm. the winds grew stronger by the hour. and the rain poured harder, soaking the east coast as the hurricane closed in. nine states declared emergencies, and people up and down the coast braced for heavy flooding, wind damage, and resulting power outages. >> i just got another load of sandbags to put around the doors to keep the water out. got the generator ready to go. and we're going to sit there and ride it out. no place else to go. >> i am worried. there's a reason to be worried. but we're going to hope for the best. that's all. you know what? i
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

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